Denver Cashes in by Seizing Cars for Low-Level Crimes, Even Without Convictions

The following excerpt is from an article that originally appeared on The Economic Crisis Report

Denver Police body camera footageDenver cab driver Semere Fremichael got caught up in an undercover prostitution sting. He was innocent—he thought she wanted a ride, not sex for pay—and was acquitted by a judge.

His taxi, however, got taken for a rough ride. Denver’s Fox affiliate has an excellent two-part investigation showing how the city attorney’s office is using civil asset forfeiture to cash in by snatching vehicles like Fremichael’s for even low-level crimes, and even when their owners aren’t convicted.

In 2016, Denver made more than $2.4 million, seizing more than 1,800 vehicles enforcing the civil forfeiture component of its public nuisance abatement laws. Civil forfeiture is a controversial procedure that allows cities (and states and the federal government) to seize and keep somebody’s assets and property without actually convicting them of a crime.

Denver put the screws to Fremichael, according to Fox reporter Rob Low, offering him a

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